OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

The Oxford Handbook of the Book of Revelation

ISBN : 9780190655433

参考価格(税込): 
¥23,100
著者: 
Craig Koester
ページ
640 ページ
フォーマット
Hardcover
サイズ
171 x 248 mm
刊行日
2020年09月
シリーズ
Oxford Handbooks
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  • Fills a gap in the study of the most divergently interpreted book in the New Testament
  • Features thirty essays from leading scholars around the world
  • Divided into sections on Literary Features, Social Setting, Theology and Ethics, History of Reception and Influence, and Currents in Interpretation

  
The Book of Revelation holds a special fascination for both scholars and the general public. The book has generated widely differing interpretations, yet Revelation has surprisingly not been the focus of many single-volume reference works. The Oxford Handbook of the Book of Revelation fills a need in the study of this controversial book. Thirty essays by leading scholars from around the world orient readers to the major currents in the study of Revelation. Divided into five sections-Literary Features, Social Setting, Theology and Ethics, History of Reception and Influence, and Currents in Interpretation-the essays identify the major lines of interpretation that have shaped discussion of these topics, and then work through the aspects of those topics that are most significant and hold greatest promise for future research.

目次: 

Preface
Contributors
Abbreviations

1. Introduction to Revelation's Social Setting, Theological Perspective, and Literary Design
Craig R. Koester

I. Literary Features of the Book of Revelation
2. The Genre of the Book of Revelation
Mitchell G. Reddish
3. Narrative Features of the Book of Revelation
James L. Resseguie
4. Imagery in the Book of Revelation
Konrad Huber
5. Rhetorical Features of the Book of Revelation
David A. deSilva
6. The Use of the Old Testament in the Book of Revelation
Steve Moyise
7. Revelation's Use of the Greek Language
David Mathewson
8. The Hymns in the Book of Revelation
Justin P. Jeffcoat Schedtler

II. Social Setting
9. Christianity and Roman Rule in First-Century Asia Minor
Warren Carter
10. Relationships among Jesus Followers and Jewish Communities in First-Century Asia Minor
Mikael Tellbe
11. Greco-Roman Religions and the Context of Revelation
Richard Ascough
12. John's Apocalypse in Relation to Johannine, Pauline, and Other Forms of Christianity in Asia Minor
Paul Trebilco

III. Theology and Ethics
13. God in the Book of Revelation
Martin Karrer
14. Jesus in the Book of Revelation
Loren L. Johns
15. The Spirit in the Book of Revelation
John Christopher Thomas
16. Creation and New Creation in the Book of Revelation
Mark B. Stephens
17. Perspectives on Evil in the Book of Revelation
Gregory Stevenson
18. Violence in the Book of Revelation
David L. Barr
19. The City-Women Babylon and New Jerusalem in the Book of Revelation
Lynn Huber
20. The People of God in the Book of Revelation
Peter S. Perry

IV. History of Reception and Influence
21. The Greek Text of Revelation
Juan Hernández
22. The Book of Revelation in the New Testament Canon
Tobias Nicklas
23. Reception History and the Interpretation of Revelation
Ian Boxall
24. The Interpretation of the Book of Revelation in Early Christianity
Charles Hill
25. The Interpretation of John's Apocalypse in the Medieval Period
Julia Eve Wannenmacher
26. Revelation in Music and Liturgy
Paul Westermeyer
27. Forms of Futuristic Interpretation of Revelation in the Modern Period
Joshua T. Searle with Kenneth Newport

V. Currents in Interpretation
28. Feminist Interpretation of the Book of Revelation
Susan Hylen
29. Interpreting Revelation through African American Cultural Studies
Thomas B. Slater
30. Post-colonial Interpretation of the Book of Revelation
Harry O. Maier

著者について: 

Edited by Craig Koester, Asher O. and Carrie Nasby Professor of New Testament, Luther Seminary
  
Craig R. Koester is Asher O. and Carrie Nasby Professor of New Testament at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota and a research associate at the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa. His primary research areas are the Gospel of John, Book of Revelation, and Epistle to the Hebrews. He is author of Revelation in the Anchor Yale Bible commentary series (2014), Revelation and the End of All Things (2018), and Symbolism in the Fourth Gospel: Meaning, Mystery, Community (2003).

  
Contributors:
  

Richard S. Ascough is a Professor in the School of Religion at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada. His research focuses on the formation early Christ groups and Greco-Roman religious culture, with particular attention to various types of associations. He is the author of Associations in the Greco-Roman World (with John Kloppenborg and Philip Harland, 2012) and 1 and 2 Thessalonians: Encountering the Christ Group at Thessalonike (2014).
  
David L. Barr is Emeritus Professor of Religion and former chair of the Departments of Religion, Philosophy, and Classics at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. His primary research areas include Jewish and Christian apocalypticism, the Book of Revelation, and stories as told in the New Testament writings. He is author of Tales of the End: A Narrative Commentary on the Book of Revelation (2012) and New Testament Story: An Introduction (2009); and editor of Reading the Book of Revelation: A Resource for Students (2003) and The Reality of Apocalypse: Rhetoric and Politics in the Book of Revelation (2006).
  
Ian Boxall is Associate Professor of New Testament at the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. His primary research areas are the Gospel of Matthew, Book of Revelation, and reception history. He is the author of Matthew Through the Centuries in the Wiley Blackwell Bible Commentaries series (2019), Patmos in the Reception History of the Apocalypse (2013), and The Revelation of St. John in the Black's New Testament Commentary series (2006).
  
Warren Carter is LaDonna Kraemer Meinders Professor of New Testament at Phillips Theological Seminary in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and formerly Professor of New Testament at Brite Divinity School at TCU in Fort Worth, Texas. His primary research areas are the New Testament Gospels, how the early Jesus movement negotiated Roman power, and the Book of Revelation. Major publications include Telling Tales About Jesus: An Introduction to the New Testament Gospels (2016), John and Empire (2008), and Matthew and the Margins (2000).
  
David A. deSilva is Trustees' Distinguished Professor of New Testament and Greek at Ashland Theological Seminary. His primary research areas are Second Temple Judaism, the Letter to the Hebrews, and the Book of Revelation. He is author of Galatians in the New International Commentary on the New Testament (2018), Introducing the Apocrypha: Message, Context, and Significance (rev. ed., 2018), and Seeing Things John's Way: The Rhetoric of the Book of Revelation (2009).
  
Juan Hernández Jr. is Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota. His primary research areas are the textual history of the book of Revelation and New Testament textual criticism. He is author of Scribal Habits and Theological Influences in the Apocalypse (2006), co-editor of Studies on the Text of the New Testament and Early Christianity (2015), and lead translator of Josef Schmid's landmark Studies in the History of the Greek Text of the Apocalypse (2018).
  
Charles E. Hill is John R. Richardson Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida. His primary research areas are Johannine Literature, the early Christian manuscript tradition, and early Christian eschatology. He is the author of Regnum Caelorum: Patterns of Millennial Thought in the Early Church (2001) and The Johannine Corpus in the Early Church (2004), and co-editor of The Early Text of the New Testament (2012).
  
Konrad Huber is Professor of New Testament Studies at the Faculty of Catholic Theology of the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany. His primary research areas are the Book of Revelation and its reception, narrative criticism, and apocryphal gospels. He is co-editor of Studien zum Neuen Testament und seiner Umwelt and author of Einer gleich einem Menschensohn: Die Christusvisionen in Offb 1,9-20 und Offb 14,14-20 und die Christologie der Johannesoffenbarung (2007).
  
Lynn R. Huber is Professor of Religious Studies at Elon University in Elon, North Carolina. Her primary research area is the Book of Revelation, especially its gendered imagery, ancient Mediterranean context, and history of reception by visionaries and visual artists. She employs metaphor theory along with feminist and queer critical lenses. She is the author of "Like a Bride Adorned:" Reading Metaphor in John's Apocalypse (2007) and Thinking and Seeing with Women in Revelation (2013), and is currently writing a feminist commentary on Revelation for Liturgical Press.
  
Susan E. Hylen is associate professor of New Testament at Emory University's Candler School of Theology in Atlanta, Georgia. Her research interests include Johannine literature and the social history of the early Roman period. Among her publications are A Modest Apostle: Thecla and the History of Women in the Early Church (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015) and Women in the New Testament World (New York: Oxford University Press, 2018).
  
Justin P. Jeffcoat Schedtler is Assistant Professor of Religion, Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa. Research interests include: Book of Revelation, Apocalypticism, and Messianic ideologies. He is author of A Heavenly Chorus: The Dramatic Function of Revelation's Hymns (2014) and co-editor of Apocalypses in Context: Apocalyptic Currents through History (2016).
  
Loren L. Johns is Professor of New Testament at Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary in Elkhart, Indiana. His primary research areas are the Book of Revelation, canon criticism, and Anabaptist approaches to Scripture. He is author of The Lamb Christology of the Apocalypse of John: An Investigation into Its Origins and Rhetorical Force (2014).
  
Martin Karrer is Professor of New Testament at the Kirchliche Hochschule Wuppertal/Bethel, Germany. His primary research areas are the Book of Revelation, the Epistle to the Hebrews, Christology ,and Septuagint. He is one of the editors of Septuaginta Deutsch (2009 / 2011) and author of Der Brief an die Hebräer in the Ökumenischer Taschenbuchkommentar series (2002/2008) and Johannesesoffenbarung in the Evangelisch-Katholischer Kommentar series (vol. 1, 2017).
  
Craig R. Koester is Asher O. and Carrie Nasby Professor of New Testament at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota and a research associate at the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa. His primary research areas are the Gospel of John, Book of Revelation, and Epistle to the Hebrews. He is author of Revelation in the Anchor Yale Bible commentary series (2014), Revelation and the End of All Things (2018), and Symbolism in the Fourth Gospel: Meaning, Mystery, Community (2003).
  
Harry O. Maier is Professor of New Testament and Early Christian Studies at Vancouver School of Theology and Fellow of the Max Weber Center for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies at the University of Erfurt. He works at the intersection of social history and emergent Christianity, with an interdisciplinary focus. His most recent books include, Picturing Paul in Empire: Imperial Image, Text, and Persuasion in Colossians, Ephesians and the Pastoral Epistles (2013) and New Testament Christianity in the Roman World (2018). Apocalypse Recalled: The Book of Revelation After Christendom (2002) is his chief contribution the study of the Apocalypse.
  
David L. Mathewson is Associate Professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary in Denver, Colorado. His main areas of research interest are the book of Revelation, and Greek and Linguistics. He has authored Intermediate Greek Grammar: A Syntax for Students of the New Testament (Baker, 2016), and Revelation: A Handbook on the Greek Text (Baylor, 2016).
  
Steve Moyise is Visiting Professor at Newman University at Birmingham, United Kingdom. His primary research areas are the Book of Revelation and the use of the Old Testament in the New Testament. He is author of Evoking Scripture. Seeing the Old Testament in the New (2008) and Was the Birth of Jesus According to Scripture? (2013).
  
Kenneth G. C. Newport is Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Theology at Liverpool Hope University. His research interests include Apocalypticism and Millennialism. He is the author of The Branch Davidians of Waco (2006) and has published extensively on the life and work of Charles Wesley.
  
Tobias Nicklas is Professor of New Testament at Universität Regensburg in Germany, Adjunct Ordinary Professor at Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, and a research associate at the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa. His main research interests are Johannine Literature (including Revelation), Christian Apocrypha, and Reception History of the New Testament. Recent publications include Jews and Christians: Second Century 'Christian' Perspectives on the Parting of the Ways (2014) and Der zweite Thessalonicherbrief (2019).
  
Peter S. Perry is Affiliate Associate Professor of New Testament at Fuller Seminary and Pastor of St. John's Lutheran Church in Glendale, Arizona. His primary research areas are the Book of Revelation, Biblical Performance Criticism, and Relevance Theory. He is the author of Insights from Performance Criticism (2016) and The Rhetoric of Digressions: Ancient Communication and Revelation 7:1-17 and 10:1-11:13 (2009).
  
Mitchell G. Reddish is O. Lafayette Walker Professor of Christian Studies and Chair, Department of Religious Studies at Stetson University in Florida. His primary research interests are apocalyptic literature, the book of Revelation, and the Gospels. He is the author of Lost Treasures of the Bible (2008; co-authored with Clyde Fant), Revelation in the Smyth and Helwys Bible Commentary series (2001), and Apocalyptic Literature: A Reader (1990).
  
James L. Resseguie is Distinguished Professor of New Testament Emeritus as Winebrenner Theological Seminary in Findlay, Ohio. His primary research areas are narrative criticism, the Book of Revelation, and the Gospel of John. He is author of Revelation of John: A Narrative Commentary (2009) and Narrative Criticism of the New Testament: An Introduction (2005), which has been translated into Italian (2008) and French (2009).
  
Joshua T. Searle is Lecturer of Theology and Public Thought at Spurgeon's College in London. His research areas are millennial studies and the social theology of evangelical Christians, especially in Eastern Europe. He is author of Theology After Christendom: Forming Prophets for a Post-Christian World (2018), The Scarlet Woman and the Red Hand: Apocalyptic Belief in the Northern Ireland Troubles (2014), and co-author (with Mykhailo Cherenkov) of A Future and a Hope: Mission, Theological Education and the Transformation of Post-Soviet Society (2014).
  
Thomas B. Slater is Professor of New Testament Studies Emeritus, McAfee School of Theology, Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia. His primary research areas are Second Temple Judaism, the Captivity Letters (Colossians, Ephesians, Philippians and Philemon) and the Book of Revelation. He is the author of Christ and Community: A Sociohistorical Study of the Christology of Revelation in the Library of New Testament Studies series (1999), Ephesians in the Smyth & Helwys Commentary Series (2012), and The Son of Man in Second Temple Judaism: Reviewing and Advancing the Scholarly Debate (2017).
  
Mark B. Stephens is Director of Integrative Studies and Research at Excelsia College in New South Wales, Australia. His primary research areas are the Book of Revelation, the practice of Christian higher education, and the intersection of theology and popular culture. He is the author of Annihilation and Renewal: The Meaning and Function of New Creation in the Book of Revelation (2011).
  
Gregory Stevenson is Professor of New Testament at Rochester University in Rochester Hills, Michigan. His primary research areas are the Book of Revelation, Greco-Roman culture, and religion and popular culture. He is author of A Slaughtered Lamb: Revelation and the Apocalyptic Response to Evil and Suffering (2013), Power and Place: Temple and Identity in the Book of Revelation (2001), and editor of the forthcoming Theology and the Marvel Universe.
  
Mikael Tellbe is Associate Professor of New Testament Exegesis at Lund University and Lecturer in New Testament Studies at Örebro School of Theology, Sweden. His primary research areas are the Pauline letters and theology, and issues relating to the formation of early Christian identity. He is author of Paul between Synagogue and State: Christians, Jews, and Civic Authorities in 1 Thessalonians, Romans, and Philippians (2001), Christ-Believers in Ephesus: A Textual Analysis of Early Christian Identity Formation in a Local Perspective (2009), and several books in Swedish.
  
John Christopher Thomas is Clarence J. Abbott Professor of Biblical Studies at Pentecostal Theological Seminary in Cleveland, Tennessee and Director of the Centre for Pentecostal and Charismatic Studies at Bangor University, Wales. His primary research areas include Gospel according to John, Book of Revelation, Pentecostal Theology, and the Book of Mormon. He is the author (with Frank D. Macchia) of Revelation in the Two Horizons Commentary Series (2016), Footwashing in John 13 and the Johannine Community (1991, 2014), and A Pentecostal Reads the Book of Mormon (2016).
  
Paul Trebilco is Professor of New Testament in the Theology Programme, University of Otago at Dunedin New Zealand. His primary research interests are Diaspora Judaism, Early Christianity in Asia Minor and the Johannine Epistles. He is the author of The Early Christians in Ephesus from Paul to Ignatius (2004), Self-designations and Group Identity in the New Testament (2011) and Outsider Designations and Boundary Construction in the New Testament (2017).
  
Julia Eva Wannenmacher, Dr. theol., has worked at Humboldt University of Berlin, Friedrich Alexander University at Erlangen-Nürnberg, and the University of Berne. Her research interests include Joachim of Fiore and his reception by later interpreters, medieval exegesis, apocalyptic thought, and political prophecy from the twelfth to twentieth centuries. Her publications include Hermeneutik der Heilsgeschichte: De septem sigillis und das Motiv der Sieben Siegel im Werk Joachims von Fiore (2005) and "Das Geheimnis des roten Drachen: Weltliche Macht und apokalyptische Verfolger in der Exegese Joachims von Fiore," in Geschichte vom Ende her denken: Endzeitentwürfe und ihre Historisierung im Mittelalter (2019).
  
Paul Westermeyer is Professor Emeritus of Church Music at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he taught courses in church music and served as Cantor and Director of the Master of Sacred Music degree with St. Olaf College. His primary research area is at the intersections of music, theology, and worship. He has written The Church Musician (1997), Te Deum: The Church and Music (1998), and the Hymnal Companion to Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2010).

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