OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

Technology and Industrial Development in Japan: Building Capabilities by Learning, Innovation and Public Policy

ISBN : 9780198838111

Price(incl.tax): 
¥6,204
Author: 
Hiroyuki Odagiri; Akira Goto
Pages
324 Pages
Format
Paperback
Size
138 x 216 mm
Pub date
Jul 2019
Series
Japan Business and Economics Series
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  • Uses a specific country study in order to inform broader arguments on development and growth.
  • Contributes to economic theory on the role of private entrepreneural activities and public policy, through a general examination of economic and industrial development, a study of the evolution of management systems, and six industrial case studies.
  • A pioneering case study of Japan's Industrial Development and Growth.

  
Japan was the first major non-western nation to take on board the Western technological and organizational advances of the century after the fist industrial revolution. It subsequently proved fully able to exploit and contribute to the broad, sustained technological advances that began in the twentieth century, as science became harnessed to technology. Japan's economic development remains a model for many technologically less advanced countries which have not yet mastered modern technology to organizational forms; and a knowledge of Japanese technological and economic history can contribute importantly to our understanding of economic growth in the modern era.
   
This book studies the industrial development of Japan since the mid-nineteenth century, with particular emphasis on how the various industries built technological capabilities. The Japanese were extraordinarily creative in searching out and learning to use modern technologies, and the authors investigate the emergence of entrepreneurs who began new and risky businesses, how the business organizations evolved to cope with changing technological conditions, and how the managers, engineers and workers acquired organizational and technological skills through technology importation, learning-by-doing, and their own R&D activities.
  
The book investigates the interaction between private entrepreneural activities and public policy, through a general examination of economic and industrial development, a study of the evolution of management systems, and six industrial case studies: textiles, iron and steel, electrical and communications equipment, automobiles, shipbuilding and aircraft, and pharmaceuticals. The authors show how the Japanese government has played an important supportive role in the continuing innovation, without being a substitute for aggressive business enterprise constantly venturing into unfamiliar terrains.

Index: 

Foreword by Richard R. Nelson
Acknowledgements
1: Introduction
2: Economic and Technological Change from the Meiji Restoration to World War II
3: The Post-War Technological Progress and Government Policies
4: The Evolution of a Management System from the Tokugawa Era to World War II
5: Management in Post-War Japan and Today
6: Textiles
7: Iron and Steel
8: Electrical and Communications Equipment
9: Automobiles
10: Shipbuilding and Aircraft
11: Pharmaceuticals
12: What Can We Learn from the Past?
Notes
Appendix
A Brief Chronology of Japan's History
Bibliography

About the author: 

Hiroyuki Odagiri, Hiroyuki Odagiri is Professor Emeritus at Hitotsubashi University
  
Akira Goto, Akira Goto is Professor Emeritus, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo
  
Richard R. Nelson, Earth Institute Columbia University

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