OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication (3-volume set)

ISBN : 9780190498986

Price(incl.tax): 
¥91,630
Author: 
Editor-in-chief: Matthew C. Nisbet, Editorial board member: Mike S. Schäfer, Editorial board member: Ezra Markowitz, Editorial board member: Jagadish Thaker, Editorial board member: Shirley S. Ho, and Editorial board member: Saffron O'Neill
Pages
2390 Pages
Format
Multiple Copy Pack
Size
178 x 254 mm
Pub date
Feb 2018
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  • State of the art synthesis and review of research across a comprehensive set of topics related to climate change communication, a rapidly growing interdisciplinary and international field that bridges research and practice.
  • Contributors from more than 20 countries and more than a dozen disciplines including communication, social psychology, information sciences, decision sciences, sociology, political science, public policy, science education, journalism studies, geography, environmental studies, and science studies.
  • As scientists and the civil society sector increasingly look to insights from the social sciences on how to more effectively engage the public and policymakers on climate change, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication features an unprecedented network of contributors who have authored articles unmatched in terms of their comprehensive coverage, international scope, scholarly depth, and applications to professional practice.

 
Through a comprehensive collection of articles, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication explores the origin and evolution of our understanding of climate change as it is presented in communication and media. Taking a multifaceted approach, the encyclopedia offers a scholarly examination of the effects of climate change communication on public opinion and policy decisions; journalistic coverage and media portrayals of climate change; communication strategies and campaigns; and the implications for effective communication, including those of outreach and advocacy efforts. Additionally, the encyclopedia reviews climate change communication research methods and approaches. Global in breadth and deeply resourced, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Climate Change Communication serves as an essential source of perspective on all aspects of this important area of scholarship. It is led by Editor in Chief Dr. Matthew C. Nisbet, along with Associate Editors Dr. Shirley S. Ho, Dr. Ezra Markowitz, Dr. Saffron O'Neill, Dr. Mike S. SchÃfer, and Dr. Jagadish Thaker.

Index: 

A
Affective Imagery, Risk Perceptions, and Climate Change Communication
Agenda Building, Narratives, and Attention Cycles in Climate Change News Coverage
Agricultural Extension and Climate Change Communication
The Arts and Humanities in Climate Change Engagement
Audience Segmentation and Climate Change Communication
C
Climate Change and Celebrity
Climate Change Communication and Indigenous Publics
Climate Change Communication in Argentina
Climate Change Communication in Austria
Climate Change Communication in Belgium
Climate Change Communication in Canada
Climate Change Communication in China
Climate Change Communication in Colombia
Climate Change Communication in Denmark
Climate Change Communication in Germany
Climate Change Communication in Hong Kong and Taiwan
Climate Change Communication in India
Climate Change Communication in Ireland
Climate Change Communication in Italy
Climate Change Communication in Japan
Climate Change Communication in Middle East and Arab Countries
Climate Change Communication in New Zealand
Climate Change Communication in Norway
Climate Change Communication in Peru
Climate Change Communication in Portugal
Climate Change Communication in Russia
Climate Change Communication in Singapore
Climate Change Communication in South Korea
Climate Change Communication in Spain
Climate Change Communication in Switzerland
Climate Change Communication in the Netherlands
Climate Change Communication in Turkey
Climate Change Communication on Facebook, Twitter, Sina Weibo, and Other Social Media Platforms
Climate Change Conspiracy Theories
Cognitive Biases, Non-Rational Judgments, and Public Perceptions of Climate Change
Communicating about Biodiversity, Public Engagement, and Climate Change
Communicating about Biofuels and Climate Change
Communicating about Carbon Capture and Storage
Communicating about Carbon Taxes and Emissions Trading Programs
Communicating about Climate Change across Workplace and Organizational Settings
Communicating about Climate Change with Corporate Leaders and Stakeholders
Communicating about Climate Change with Farmers
Communicating about Climate Change with Journalists and Media Producers
Communicating about Climate Change with Policymakers
Communicating about Climate Change with Religious Groups and Leaders
Communicating about Climate Change with Urban Populations and Decision-Makers
Communicating about Fossil Fuel Divestment
Communicating about Hydropower, Dams, and Climate Change
Communicating about Nuclear Energy and Climate Change
Communicating about Solar Energy and Climate Change
Communicating Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience
Communicating Sea Level Rise
Communicating the Public Health Risks of Climate Change
Communication Strategies of Environmental NGOs and Advocacy Groups
Content Analysis in Climate Change Communication
Countering Climate Science Denial and Communicating Scientific Consensus
D
Determinants and Measurement of Climate Change Risk Perception, Worry, and Concern
Discourse Analysis in Climate Change Communication
Documentary and Edutainment Portrayals of Climate Change and their Societal Impacts
E
Economic Conditions and Public Opinion on Climate Change
Economic, Technological, and Organizational Factors Influencing News Coverage of Climate Change
Effects of Rapid Climate Change on Violence and Conflict
Effects of Social Media Use on Climate Change Opinion, Knowledge, and Behavior
Effects of TV and Cable News Viewing on Climate Change Opinion, Knowledge, and Behavior
Elite News Coverage of Climate Change
Engaging with Climate Change Imagery
Entertainment Film and TV Portrayals of Climate Change and their Societal Impacts
Ethics for Climate Change Communicators
F
Fear Appeals in Climate Change Communication
Frame Analysis in Climate Change Communication
Framing of Climate Change in United States Science Education
G
Geographies of Climate Change Beliefs
"Global Warming" versus "Climate Change" and the Influence of Labeling on Public Perceptions
I
Ideology in Climate Change Communication
Impact of Journalistic Background, Professional Norms, and Culture on Climate Change Coverage
Influence of Labelling and Incivility on Climate Change Communication
The Information Deficit Model and Climate Change Communication
Internet-Enabled Activism and Climate Change
J
Journalistic Depictions of Uncertainty about Climate Change
L
Linguistic Analysis in Climate Change Communication
M
Media Coverage on International Climate Summits and Negotiations
Mental Models and Risk Perceptions of Climate Change
Methods for Assessing Journalistic Decisions, Advocacy Strategies, and Climate Change Communication Practices
Methods for Assessing Online Climate Change Communication, Social Media Discussion, and Behavior
Methods for Assessing Visual Images and Depictions of Climate Change
N
Narrative Persuasion and Storytelling as Climate Communication Strategies
Communication, Negotiation, and Influence at International Climate Change Meetings and Summits
O
Objectivity, False Balance, and Advocacy in News Coverage of Climate Change
Online and Social Media Campaigns for Climate Change Engagement
P
Participatory and Deliberative Approaches to Climate Change
Partisan Cueing and Polarization in Public Opinion about Climate Change
Perceived Temporal and Geographic Distance and Public Opinion about Climate Change
Personal Experience, Extreme Weather Events, and Perceptions of Climate Change
Political Participation and Voting Relevant to Climate Change
Portrayal and Impacts of Climate Change in Advertising and Consumer Campaigns
Psychological Challenges in Communicating about Climate Change and its Uncertainties
Psychological, Social, and Cultural Barriers to Communicating about Climate Change
Public Knowledge, Scientific Literacy, Numeracy, and Perceptions of Climate Change
R
Race, Class, Gender and Climate Change Communication
Religious Identity, Beliefs and Views about Climate Change
S
Scientists' Views about Public Engagement and Science Communication in the Context of Climate Change
Shifting Roles of Science Journalists Covering Climate Change
Social Capital and Climate Change Adaptation
Social Movement Participation and Climate Change
Source Influence on Journalistic Decisions and News Coverage of Climate Change
Strategic Framing and Persuasive Messaging to Influence Climate Change Perceptions and Decisions
Strategies for Countering False Information and Beliefs about Climate Change
Sustainability Science and Climate Change Communication
T
TV and Cable News Coverage of Climate Change
TV Meteorologists as Local Climate Change Educators
W
Wildfire Communication and Climate Risk Mitigation
Y
Young People and Climate Change Communication
Z
Zoos and Aquaria as Informal Learning Environments for Climate Change Communication
TOPICAL OUTLINE OF ARTICLES:
Climate Change Public Opinion, Knowledge, and Behavior
Conceptualizing and Evaluating the Role of Public Opinion in Societal Decisions
— The Information Deficit Model and Climate Change Communication
Cognitive Processing, Heuristics and Perceptions of Climate Change
— Mental Models and Risk Perceptions of Climate Change
— Cognitive Biases, Non-Rational Judgments, and Public Perceptions of Climate Change
— Public Knowledge, Scientific Literacy, Numeracy, and Perceptions of Climate Change
— Partisan Cueing and Polarization in Public Opinion about Climate Change
— Affective Imagery, Risk Perceptions, and Climate Change Communication
— Perceived Temporal and Geographic Distance and Public Opinion about Climate Change
— "Global Warming" versus "Climate Change" and the Influence of Labeling on Public Perceptions
Personal Experience, Salience, and Perceptions of Climate Change
— Economic Conditions and Public Opinion on Climate Change
— Personal Experience, Extreme Weather Events, and Perceptions of Climate Change
Emotion, Social Norms, and Public Opinion about Climate Change
— Countering Climate Science Denial and Communicating Scientific Consensus
— Determinants and Measurement of Climate Change Risk Perception, Worry, and Concern
Values, Worldviews and Public Perceptions
— Climate Change Conspiracy Theories
Social Identity, Background, and Public Perceptions
— Race, Class, Gender and Climate Change Communication
— Geographies of Climate Change Beliefs
Ethics, Morals, Cultural Beliefs and Perceptions of Climate Change
— Religious Identity, Beliefs and Views about Climate Change
— Ethics for Climate Change Communicators
Climate Change-Related Social, Political, and Consumer Behavior
— Political Participation and Voting Relevant to Climate Change
— Social Movement Participation and Climate Change
— Social Capital and Climate Change Adaptation
— Effects of Rapid Climate Change on Violence and Conflict
Media Portrayals of Climate Change and their Societal Effects
Social, Ideological, and Cultural Factors Shaping News Media Portrayals
— Objectivity, False Balance, and Advocacy in News Coverage of Climate Change
— Journalistic Depictions of Uncertainty about Climate Change
— Agenda Building, Narratives, and Attention Cycles in Climate Change News Coverage
— Ideology in Climate Change Communication
— Scientists' Views about Public Engagement and Science Communication in the Context of Climate Change
Organizational and Source Influences on Climate Change Coverage
— Impact of Journalistic Background, Professional Norms, and Culture on Climate Change Coverage
— Shifting Roles of Science Journalists Covering Climate Change
— Economic, Technological, and Organizational Factors Influencing News Coverage of Climate Change
— Source Influence on Journalistic Decisions and News Coverage of Climate Change
Media Portrayals of Climate Change across News Outlet and Type of Organization
— Elite News Coverage of Climate Change
— TV and Cable News Coverage of Climate Change
— Climate Change Communication on Facebook, Twitter, Sina Weibo, and Other Social Media Platforms
Journalistic Decisions and News Coverage Specific to Major Political Focusing Events
— Media Coverage on International Climate Summits and Negotiations
News and Social Media Use and their Effects on Audiences
— Effects of TV and Cable News Viewing on Climate Change Opinion, Knowledge, and Behavior
— Effects of Social Media Use on Climate Change Opinion, Knowledge, and Behavior
Non-Traditional Media Portrayals of Climate Change and Their Societal Impacts
— Engaging with Climate Change Imagery
— Documentary and Edutainment Portrayals of Climate Change and their Societal Impacts
— Entertainment Film and TV Portrayals of Climate Change and their Societal Impacts
— Portrayal and Impacts of Climate Change in Advertising and Consumer Campaigns
Climate Change Communication Strategies and Campaigns
Major Challenges, Debates, and Issues in Climate Change Communication
— Psychological, Social, and Cultural Barriers to Communicating about Climate Change
— TV Meteorologists as Local Climate Change Educators
— Psychological Challenges in Communicating about Climate Change and its Uncertainties
— Influence of Labelling and Incivility on Climate Change Communication
Communication, Persuasion, and Message Design Strategies
— Narrative Persuasion and Storytelling as Climate Communication Strategies
— Strategic Framing and Persuasive Messaging to Influence Climate Change Perceptions and Decisions
— Fear Appeals in Climate Change Communication
— Strategies for Countering False Information and Beliefs about Climate Change
— Audience Segmentation and Climate Change Communication
Public Education Campaigns and Informal Learning Initiatives
— The Arts and Humanities in Climate Change Engagement
— Zoos and Aquaria as Informal Learning Environments for Climate Change Communication
— Communicating about Climate Change across Workplace and Organizational Settings
— Climate Change and Celebrity
— Participatory and Deliberative Approaches to Climate Change
— Online and Social Media Campaigns for Climate Change Engagement
Activism, Mobilization, and Political Influence Campaigns
— Communication Strategies of Environmental NGOs and Advocacy Groups
— Internet-Enabled Activism and Climate Change
— Communication, Negotiation, and Influence at International Climate Change Meetings and Summits
Climate Change Communication with Specialized Groups
— Communicating about Climate Change with Journalists and Media Producers
— Young People and Climate Change Communication
— Framing of Climate Change in United States Science Education
— Communicating about Climate Change with Religious Groups and Leaders
— Communicating about Climate Change with Corporate Leaders and Stakeholders
— Climate Change Communication and Indigenous Publics
— Communicating about Climate Change with Urban Populations and Decision-Makers
— Communicating about Climate Change with Farmers
— Communicating about Climate Change with Policymakers
Communication, Media, and Public Opinion about Climate Change Impacts
Environmental Impacts of Climate Change
— Communicating Sea Level Rise
— Communicating about Biodiversity, Public Engagement, and Climate Change
— Wildfire Communication and Climate Risk Mitigation
Human and Societal Impacts of Climate Change
— Communicating the Public Health Risks of Climate Change
— Agricultural Extension and Climate Change Communication
— Sustainability Science and Climate Change Communication
Communication, Media, and Public Opinion about Climate Change Policies and Technologies
Climate Mitigation and Adaptation Policies and Actions
— Communicating about Carbon Taxes and Emissions Trading Programs
— Communicating about Fossil Fuel Divestment
— Communicating Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience
Climate Change Technologies and Clean Energy Sources
— Communicating about Solar Energy and Climate Change
— Communicating about Nuclear Energy and Climate Change
— Communicating about Biofuels and Climate Change
— Communicating about Hydropower, Dams, and Climate Change
— Communicating about Carbon Capture and Storage
Communication, Media, and Public Opinion about Climate Change across Countries
Europe
— Climate Change Communication in Germany
— Climate Change Communication in Austria
— Climate Change Communication in Switzerland
— Climate Change Communication in Denmark
— Climate Change Communication in Norway
— Climate Change Communication in the Netherlands
— Climate Change Communication in Belgium
— Climate Change Communication in Ireland
— Climate Change Communication in Spain
— Climate Change Communication in Portugal
— Climate Change Communication in Italy
— Climate Change Communication in Russia
— Climate Change Communication in Turkey
Asia and Oceania
— Climate Change Communication in China
— Climate Change Communication in Hong Kong and Taiwan
— Climate Change Communication in South Korea
— Climate Change Communication in Japan
— Climate Change Communication in India
— Climate Change Communication in Singapore
— Climate Change Communication in New Zealand
North and Central America
— Climate Change Communication in Canada
South America
— Climate Change Communication in Colombia
— Climate Change Communication in Peru
— Climate Change Communication in Argentina
Middle East and Africa
— Climate Change Communication in Middle East and Arab Countries
Methods of Analyzing and Evaluating Climate Change Communication
Assessing the Content of Climate Change Communication and Media Portrayals
— Content Analysis in Climate Change Communication
— Frame Analysis in Climate Change Communication
— Linguistic Analysis in Climate Change Communication
— Discourse Analysis in Climate Change Communication
— Methods for Assessing Visual Images and Depictions of Climate Change
— Methods for Assessing Online Climate Change Communication, Social Media Discussion, and Behavior
— Methods for Assessing Journalistic Decisions, Advocacy Strategies, and Climate Change Communication Practices

About the author: 

Editor-in-chief: Matthew C. Nisbet, Dr., Northeastern University
Editorial board member: Mike S. Schäfer, Professor, University of Zurich
Editorial board member: Ezra Markowitz, Dr., University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Editorial board member: Jagadish Thaker, Lecturer, Massey University
Editorial board member: Shirley S. Ho, Professor, Nanyang Technological University
Editorial board member: Saffron O'Neill, Professor, University of Exeter
 
Matthew C. Nisbet (Editor in Chief) is Professor of Communication Studies and Affiliate Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University. He is Editor in Chief of the journal Environmental Communication and a consulting communication researcher to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Nisbet holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in Communication from Cornell University and a B.A. in Government from Dartmouth College.

Shirley S. Ho (Associate Ed.) is Associate Professor and Assistant Chair for Faculty Affairs in the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Her research focuses on cross-cultural public opinion dynamics related to science and technology, with potential health or environmental impacts. Specifically, her work emphasizes the roles of values, social media and other emerging modes of communication in shaping public attitudes toward science and technology.

Ezra Markowitz (Associate Ed.) is Assistant Professor of Environmental Decision-Making at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His research focuses on the intersection of decision-making, persuasive communication and environmental sustainability.

Saffron O'Neill (Associate Ed.) is Associate Professor in Geography at the University of Exeter, UK. Her research focuses on risk perception, risk communication and public engagement with climate change and climate variability; and the implications of these areas for public policy.

Mike S. Schäfer (Associate Ed.) is Professor of Communication Science at the University of Zurich and Director of the University's Center for Higher Education and Science Studies (CHESS). His research focuses on science communication and climate change communication in legacy and online media, as well as on theories of the public sphere.

Jagadish Thaker (Associate Ed.) is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing at Massey University. His research examines ways to understand and enhance vulnerable communities' adaptive capacity to climate change impacts, and he specializes in the fields of science and climate change communication, health communication, and strategic communication campaigns.

 

 

 

Contributors:

Karen Akerlof, George Mason University
Heather Akin, University of Pennsylvania
Daniel P. Aldrich, Northeastern University
Johnie J. Allen, Iowa State University
Ashley A. Anderson, Colorado State University
Craig A. Anderson, Iowa State University
Alison Anderson, Plymouth University
Midori Aoyagi, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan
Dorothee Arlt, University of Bern
Dimitrinka Atanasova, Queen Mary University of London
Lucy Atkinson, University of Texas at Austin
Matthew T. Ballew, Claremont Graduate University
Wendy-Lin Bartels, University of Florida
Sarah Bell, University College London
Lorenzo Beltrame, University of Exeter
Salil Benegal, DePauw University
John C. Besley, Michigan State University
Gwendolyn Blue, University of Calgary
Daan Boezeman, Radboud University
Toby Bolsen, Georgia State University
Heinz Bonfadelli, University of Zurich
Christopher P. Borick, Muhlenberg College
Ann Bostrom, University of Washington
Amanda Boyd, Washington State University
Maxwell Boykoff, University of Colorado Boulder
Graham L. Bradley, Griffith University
Dominique Brossard, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Michael Brüggemann, University of Hamburg
Massimiano Bucchi, University of Trento
David V. Budescu, Fordham University
Gary Burniske, Purdue University
K.C. Busch, North Carolina State University
Michael A. Cacciatore, University of Georgia
Candis Callison, University of British Columbia 
Anabela Carvalho, University of Minho
Jeong-Heon Chang, CHA University
Eric Chu, University of Birmingham 
Agnes S. F. Chuah, Nanyang Technological University
Brett Clark, University of Utah
Susan Clayton, College of Wooster
John Cook, University of Queensland
Kathryn E. Cooper, Ohio State University
Jacob Copple, University of Texas at Austin
Julia B. Corbett, University of Utah
James F. M. Cornwell, United States Military Academy at West Point
Michelle Covi, Old Dominion University
Heidi Cullen, Climate Central
Steven D'Alessandro, Charles Sturt University
Hannah Dallas, University of Rhode Island
Luo Dan, Wuhan University
Art Dewulf, Wageningen University
Graham Dixon, Washington State University
Karen M. Douglas, University of Kent
Julie Doyle, University of Brighton
Aaron B. Driver, University of New England
Anthony Dudo, University of Texas at Austin
Nicholas Eng, Nanyang Technological University
Sven Engesser, University of Zurich
María Carmen Erviti, University of Navarra
Mikkel Fugl Eskjær, Aalborg University Copenhagen
Declan Fahy, Dublin City University
Nathan Farrell, Bournemouth University
Lauren Feldman, Rutgers University
Alison Fisher, University of Rhode Island
Kjersti Fløttum, University of Bergen
Michele Fontana, Victoria University of Wellington
María Margarita Fontecha, University of Florida
Emmet Fox, Anglia Ruskin University 
César J. Galarza, Environmental Public Policy Consultant
Ned Gardiner, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Kevin Gardner, University of New Hamsphire
R. Kelly Garrett, Ohio State University
Neil T. Gavin, University of Liverpool
Nathaniel Geiger, The Pennsylvania State University
Timothy A. Gibson, George Mason University
Jaime Gilden, Ohio State University
James Goodman, University of Technology Sydney
Michael K. Goodman, University of Reading
Caroline Gottschalk Druschke, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Deborah Lynn Guber, University of Vermont
Randolph Haluza-DeLay, The King's University
Anders Hansen, University of Leicester
David Hart, University of Maine
Daniel Hermelin, EAFIT University
Luis E. Hestres, University of Texas at San Antonio
Donald W. Hine, University of New England
Shirley S. Ho, Nanyang Technological University
Emily H. Ho, Fordham University
Andrew J. Hoffman, University of Michigan
Jill E. Hopke, DePaul University
Debbie Hopkins, University of Oxford
Ana Horta, University of Lisbon
Cristi C. Horton, University of Texas at El Paso
Candice Howarth, University of Surrey
Michael Howlett, National University of Singapore
Anna Hurlimann, The University of Melbourne
Michael D. Jones, Oregon State University
Myung-Hyun Kang, Hallym University
Sei-Hill Kim, University of South Carolina
Nelya Koteyko, Queen Mary University of London
Erick Lachapelle, University of Montreal
Yuliya Lakew, Örebro University
Michael Lamb, Wake Forest University
Anthony Leiserowitz, Yale University
Luisa Fernanda Lema Vélez, Fondo Acción
Bienvenido León, University of Navarra
Stephan Lewandowsky, University of Bristol
Ji Li, Wuhan University
Enzo Loner, University of Trento
Julia Lück, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Gesa Lüdecke, City of Munich
Emma Lundberg, University of Rhode Island
Yanni Ma, Washington State University
Pieter Maeseele, University of Antwerp
Edward Maibach, George Mason University
Ezra Markowitz, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Alejandra Martinez, Geophysical Institute of Peru
Sarah M. McCaffrey, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service
Rachel I. McDonald, University of Kansas
Bridie McGreavy, University of Maine
M. Teresa Mercado-Sáez, Universidad Cardenal Herrera CEU
Julia Metag, University of Fribourg
Brianna Middlewood, The Pennsylvania State University
Taciano L. Milfont, Victoria University of Wellington
Mark Morrison, Charles Sturt University
Susanne C. Moser, Susanne Moser Research & Consulting
Ishani Mukherjee, National University of Singapore
Teresa Myers, George Mason University
Sarah Naiman, Cornell University
Erik C. Nisbet, Ohio State University
Matthew C. Nisbet, Northeastern University
Maria Ojala, Örebro University
Saffron O'Neill, University of Exeter
Courtney Page, Northeastern University
James Painter, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism
Christopher J. Paul, North Carolina Central University
Adam R. Pearson, Pomona College
Yves Pepermans, University of Antwerp
Ellen Peters, Ohio State University
Tarla Rai Peterson, University of Texas at El Paso
Wendy J. Phillips, University of New England
Courtney Plante, Iowa State University
Han-Hui Por, Educational Testing Service
Senja Post, University of Zurich
Rebecca Power, University of Wisconsin-Extension
Rebecca Priestley, Victoria University of Wellington
Linda S. Prokopy, Purdue University
Tyler Quiring, University of Maine
Barry G. Rabe, University of Michigan
Sara Randall, University of Maine
Henrike Rau, LMU Munich
Joseph P. Reser, Griffith University
Markus Rhomberg, Zeppelin University
Elizabeth Rohring, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Marianne Ryghaug, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Sonya Sachdeva, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service
Ümit Sahin, Sabanci University
Rhian Salmon, Victoria University of Wellington
Mike S. Schäfer, University of Zurich
Todd Schenk, Virginia Tech
Jonathon P. Schuldt, Cornell University
Lyle Scruggs, University of Connecticut
Alexandra Segerberg, Stockholm University
Keith Seitter, American Meteorological Society
James Shanahan, Indiana University
Matthew A. Shapiro, Illinois Institute of Technology
Amelia Sharman, London School of Economics and Political Science
Tsung-Jen Shih, National Chengchi University
Tomas Moe Skjølsvold, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Nicholas Smith, University of Westminster
Francesca Soluri, University of Rhode Island
Leona Yi-Fan Su, University of Utah
Sean Sublette, Climate Central
Brianne Suldovsky, Portland State University
Janet Swim, The Pennsylvania State University
Bruno Takahashi, Michigan State University
Edson C. Tandoc, Jr., Nanyang Technological University 
Jagadish Thaker, Massey University
D. B. Tindall, University of British Columbia
Eric Toman, Ohio State University
Dunia H. Urrego, University of Exeter
Joseph E. Uscinski, University of Miami
Mehmet Ali Uzelgun, Nova University of Lisbon
Sander van der Linden, Princeton University
Martinus Vink, Wageningen University
Emily K. Vraga, George Mason University
Bud Ward, Yale Climate Connections
Melinda R. Weathers, Sam Houston State University
Hartmut Wessler, University of Mannheim
John Wihbey, Northeastern University
Robyn S. Wilson, Ohio State University
Joe Witte, ADNET/NASA-Goddard
Jens Wolling, Ilmenau University of Technology
Bernadette Woods Placky, Climate Central
Antal Wozniak, University of Exeter
Dmitry Yagodin, University of Tampere
Steven Yearley, University of Edinburgh
Lisa Zaval, Columbia University

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