OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

Arms Industry Transformation and Integration: The Choices of Central Europe

ISBN : 9780199271733

Price(incl.tax): 
¥11,506
Author: 
Yudit Kiss
Pages
464 Pages
Format
Hardcover
Size
164 x 243 mm
Pub date
May 2014
Series
SIPRI Monographs
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The defence industry was one of the pillars of the command economy system in East Central Europe. After the end of the cold war the sector went through dramatic changes: it was radically downsized, reorganized and restructured according to the needs of the emerging new socio-economic systems. One of the major factors that shaped this adjustment was the enlargement of NATO and the European Union and the prospect of integration into these two organizations. The military establishments and defence industries became principal actors in the integration process, which helped them to acquire political legitimization and new economic resources. At the same time, integration presented unexpected challenges and constraints for the regions restructuring defence industry. This book presents a comparative analysis of the defence industries of six East Central European countries-Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia-describing how they adjusted to the changed political and economic environment in both the domestic and international contexts. After the cold war, arms makers in East Central Europe found themselves confronting a situation like that faced by many of today's industrial producers: a drastic change of the economic, political and social environment. Their experiences provide valuable lessons for governments and companies in the post-2008 global economy.

Index: 

1. INTRODUCTION
I. Post-cold war East Central Europe
II. The importance of the topic
III. Methodology
2. THE POST-COLD WAR EVOLUTION OF THE ARMS INDUSTRY
I. Drivers of the transformation of the arms industry
II. The new structure of the arms industry
III. The arms industries of East Central Europe: crisis and partial recovery
3. POLAND: A QUALIFIED SUCCESS STORY
I. Arms industry policy in the 1990s: protection
II. Arms industry policy in the 2000s: promotion
III. The arms industry
IV. Military expenditure and procurement policy
V. Recent developments
VI. Conclusions
APPENDIX 3A. POLISH COMPANY CASE STUDIES
I. Bumars rise from a domestic company to a potential regional giant
II. ARP: an indigenous engine of development
III. PZL-Swidnik: succcess via international cooperation
IV. PZL-Mielec: a regional company that became an international player
V. The Euro-Park Mielec special economic zone and the Aviation Valley
VI. The F-16 deal
4. HUNGARY: THE TWISTS AND TURNS OF TRANSFORMATION
I. Arms industry policy: liberalism with elements of protectionism
II. The arms industry
III. Military expenditure and procurement policy
III. Military expenditure and procurement policy
V. Conclusions
APPENDIX 4A. HUNGARIAN COMPANY CASE STUDIES
I. Fegyver- es Gazkeszulekgyar Ltd: coping without the state
II. Raba Jarmuipari Holding NyRt: a winner
III. Dunai Repulogepgyar Rt: the history in a nutshell
IV. MFS 2000 Ltd: a typical Hungarian company
V. HM Currus Godolloi Harcjarmutechnikai Rt: an MOD company
VI. Pro Patria Electronics: an amphibian-like company in a turbulent environment
VII. The new Hungarian aviation industry
5. A COMPARISON OF POLAND AND HUNGARY
I. The size and the state of the economy and the arms industry
II. The arms industrys place in the economy
III. Defence industrial policy
IV. The Warsaw Pact heritage
V. The arms industrys links with national armed forces and participation in foreign operations
VI. Foreign ownership and partnerships
VII. Conclusions
APPENDIX 5A. COMPARING A POLISH AND A HUNGARIAN COMPANY
I. Osrodek Badawczo-Rozwojowy Sprzetu Mechanicznego Sp. z o.o.
II. Gamma Muszaki ZRt
6. THE CZECH REPUBLIC: BRIGHT PROMISES AND SOBER REALITY
I. Defence industrial policy: from conversion to selective promotion
II. The arms industry
III. Military expenditure and procurement
APPENDIX 6A. CZECH COMPANY CASE STUDIES
I. Aero Vodochody: out of the zone of turbulence
II. The VERA surveillance system: endogenous research and development
III. Tatra: success via foreign ownership
IV. The Sellier & Bellot ammunition company: a typical Czech Company
7. SLOVAKIA: FROM A NATIONALIST BACKWATER TO A SLAVIC TIGER
I. Defence industrial policy
II. The arms industry
III. Military procurement and exports
APPENDIX 7A. SLOVAK COMPANY CASE STUDIES
I. The spectacular conversion of the Slovak military triangle
II. ZTS-pecial and ZTS-Metalurgia: dealing with the legacy of the Warsaw Pact
III. Way Industry: a successful conversion
IV. ZVS Holding: a typical Slovak company
8. BULGARIA: THE CHALLENGE OF CATCHING UP
I. A stopgo defence industrial policy
II. The arms industry
III. Procurement
APPENDIX 8A. BULGARIAN COMPANY CASE STUDIES
I. The Terem group: a difficult privatization
II. Arcus: successful privatization via management employee buyout
III. Arsenal: a typical Bulgarian company
IV. Vazov Engineering Works: a difficult transformation
V. Electron Progress: success on civil and military markets
9. ROMANIA: HIGH AMBITIONS, HARSH REALITIES AND PRAGMATISM
I. Defence industrial policy
II. The arms industry
III. Military procurement
IV. Exports
V. Poland and Romania: a comparison
APPENDIX 9A. ROMANIAN COMPANY CASE STUDIES
I. Romarm: a difficult transformation
II. Cugir: a typical Romanian company
III. The Romanian aviation industry
10. THE NEW ARMS INDUSTRY IN EAST CENTRAL EUROPE
I. Key factors affecting the choice of a new defence industrial model
II. Defence industrial adjustment models
III. The outcome of defence industrial transformations
IV. The revitalized arms industry in East Central Europe
V. The arms industry and politics
VI. Changes at the company level
11. THE IMPACT OF EU AND NATO MEMBERSHIP
I. The rush towards EU and NATO membership
II. East Central Europe and membership of NATO
III. EU membership
IV. Striking a balance between the EU and NATO
V. Future prospects
12. CONCLUSIONS
I. The arms industry in East Central Europe today: its nature and status
II. The East Central European defence industry in the global production and trade of weapons
III. General lessons and insights from East Central Europe

About the author: 

Yudit Kiss (Hungary) is an economist. She received her PhD from Karl Marx University of Economics, Budapest, in 1989. Since 1992 she has worked as an independent researcher, based in Geneva. From 1993 to 1995 she studied conversion and defence industry restructuring under a MacArthur Foundation grant. Her publications include The Defence Industry in East-Central Europe: Restructuring and Conversion (OUP 1997), Regional and Employment Consequences of the Defence Industry Transformation in East Central Europe (International Labour Office, 1999), Small Arms and Light Weapons Production in Eastern, Central and Southeast Europe (Small Arms Survey, 2004) and East-Central European arms industries: between consolidation and crisis, Contemporary Security Policy (August 2011).

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