OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

A History of Russian Literature

ISBN : 9780199663941

Price(incl.tax): 
¥11,869
Author: 
Andrew Kahn; Mark Lipovetsky; Irina Reyfman; Stephanie Sandler
Pages
976 Pages
Format
Hardcover
Size
171 x 246 mm
Pub date
Apr 2018
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Russia possesses one of the richest and most admired literatures of Europe, reaching back to the eleventh century. This History of Russian Literature provides a comprehensive account of Russian writing from its earliest origins in the monastic works of Kiev up to the present day, still rife with the creative experiments of post-Soviet literary life. Readers will find here accounts of certain genres, including heroic lays and spiritual poetry (dukhovnye stikhi), the novel, elegy and love poetry; movements such as Sentimentalism, Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, the Avant-garde, and Postmodernism. And readers will find discussions of the well- and lesser-known writers who have contributed to this influential and vital tradition for each of these periods and genres.

Index: 

PART I. THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD
Institutions and contexts: writing and authorship, 1100-1400
Holy Russia: landmarks in medieval literature
Local narratives
PART II. THE EARLY MODERN: THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY
Paradise Lost: National narratives
Cultural interface: printing, Humanist learning and Orthodox resistance in the second half of the seventeenth century
Court theater
Poets
Prose
PART III. THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
Defining Classicism: the canons of taste
Institutions of writing and authorship
National narratives
Poetics and subjectivities between Classicism and Romanticism
Prose fiction
PART IV. THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
Institutions
The Literary Field: from amateur societies to professional institutions and literary alliances
Subjectivities
Forms of Prose
Literary identity and social structure of the Imperial period
Types: Heroes and anti-heroes
Heroines and emancipation
Narratives of nation-building
PART V. THE TWENTIETH AND TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES
Institutions
The Poetics of Subjectivity
The Poetics of Language
Prose and Drama: negotiations with history
Catastrophic narratives
Intelligentsia narratives

About the author: 

Andrew Kahn is Professor of Russian Literature at the University of Oxford. His the author and editor of several books on the Russian eighteenth-century and Alexander Pushkin, including Pushkin's Lyric Intelligence (OUP, 2008), has published widely on the Russian eighteenth-century and history of ideas, and is the author of many articles on twentieth-century Russian poetry. In the Oxford World's Classics he has edited and introduced Pushkin's Queen of Spades and Other Stories, Lermontov's Hero of Our Time, Montesquieu's Persian Letters, and Tolstoy's Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories. His current projects include a monograph on the poetry, politics and aesthetic ideas of Osip Mandelstam, and a literary life of Alexander Pushkin. Together with Irina Reyfman he is preparing a translation of Alexander Radishchev's Journey, a major eighteenth-century work, for the Russia Reads series at Columbia University Press.; Mark Lipovetsky is Professor of Russian Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder (USA). He is the author of seven books on Russian literature and culture including Russian Postmodernist Fiction: Dialogue with Chaos (1999), Paralogies: Transformations of the (Post)Modernist Discourse in Russian Culture of the 1920s-2000s(2008), and Performing Violence: Literary and Theatrical Experiments of New Russian Drama (with Birgit Beumers). He has co-edited the volume of Dictionary of Literary Biography: Russian Writers Since 1980 (Gale Group in 2003), an anthology of Russian and Soviet wondertales, Politicizing Magic (2005), Veselye chelovechki: Cult Heroes of Soviet Childhood (2008) , and A Non-Canonical Classic: D. A. Prigov (2010), Charms of Cynical Reason: the Trickster's Transformations s in Soviet and post-Soviet Culture (2011), and edited (with Evgeny Dobrenko) Russian Literature since 1991 (CUP, 2015). ; Irina Reyfman is professor of Russian Language and Literature at Columbia University. In her studies, Reyfman focuses on the interaction of literature and culture, examining both how literature reacts to cultural phenomena and how it contributes to the formation of cultural biases and forms of behavior. Reyfman is the author of How Russia Learned to Write: Literature and the Imperial Table of Rannks (Madison, Wisconsin, 2016), Vasilii Trediakovsky: The Fool of the `New' Russian Literature (Stanford, 1990), and Ritualized Violence Russian Style: The Duel in Russian Culture and Literature (Stanford, 1999); the latter book also appeared in Russian (Moscow: Novoe Literaturnoe obozrenie, 2002). She is also a co-editor (with Catherine T. Nepomnyashchy and Hilde Hoogenboom) of Mapping the Feminine: Russian Women and Cultural Difference (Bloomington, IN: Slavica, 2008).; Stephanie Sandler is the Ernest E. Monrad Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University. She has written on Pushkin and on the legends surrounding him in Russian culture, including Distant Pleasures: Alexander Pushkin and the Writing of Exile (1989) and Commemorating Pushkin: Russia's Myth of a National Poet (2004). Other interests include ideas of selfhood and identity in Russian literature and film, which led to an edited volume, Self and Story in Russian History (2000, with Laura Engelstein); and questions of sex and gender, subject of another edited volume, Sexuality and the Body in Russian Culture (1993, 1998, with Jane Costlow and Judith Vowles). She has edited a pioneering collection of essays on the contemporary Moscow poet Olga Sedakova, published in Russia in 2017 and due out in English with Madison University Press. Her current work is on contemporary Russian poetry, and she has been translating several poets.

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