OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Health and Risk Message Design and Processing: 4-volume set

ISBN : 9780190455378

Price(incl.tax): 
¥122,430
Author: 
Roxanne Parrott
Pages
2384 Pages
Format
Hardcover
Size
178 x 254 mm
Pub date
Jan 2018
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The Oxford Encyclopedia of Health and Risk Message Design and Processing is a collection of over 130 articles, compiled as an up-to-date and comprehensive theoretically guided work in health and risk communication by over 150 scholars from around the world. As research and practice dedicated to communicating about health and risk to lay audiences grows exponentially, this work seeks to ensure that what is communicated is not only scientifically accurate but also avoids any partial information or overemphasis of particular features that result in beliefs or actions that may result in personal or societal harms.

Index: 

I. Uncertainty and uses of evidence; Ethical Issues and Considerations in Health and Risk Message Design; Scientific Uncertainty in Health and Risk Messaging; Health and Risk Policymaking, the Precautionary Principle, and Policy Advocacy; Public Relations in Health and Risk Communication; II. Social determinants of health and risk; Social-Ecological Approaches to Health and Risk Messaging; Culture, a Social Determinant of Health and Risk Considerations for Health and Risk Messaging; Health Disparities, a Social Determinant of Health and Risk: Considerations for Health and Risk Messaging; Health Promotion and Risk Reduction in Congregations; Neighborhood Considerations for Social Determinants of Health and Risk; III. Agents for change; Advocacy Groups as Agents for Change in Health and Risk Messaging; Supportive Communication Providers for Chronic Disease Management; Health Care Teams as Agents for Change in Health and Risk Messaging; Equity and Distributive Justice in Health and Risk Message Design and Processing; Government-driven Incentives to Improve Health; Parents as Agents for Change in Health and Risk Messaging; Public Health and Community Organizing as Agents for Change in Health and Risk Messaging; Rehabilitation Groups; Advertisers as Agents for Change in Health and Risk Messaging; Faith Communities and the Potential for Health Promotion; Work as Opportunity and Problem When Trying to Impact Health and Risk; IV. Normative approaches; Appeal to Bystander Interventions: A Normative Approach to Health and Risk Messaging; Communities of Practice in Health and Risk Messaging; Collective Knowledge for Industrial Disaster Prevention; Entertainment-Education and Health and Risk Messaging; Positive Deviance: A Non-Normative Approach to Health and Risk Messaging; Risk Governance; V. Integrative approaches; Diffusion Theory in Integrative Approaches; Absent information in Integrative Environmental and Health Risk Communication; Inoculation Theory Applied in Health and Risk Messaging; Disruption Information Seeking and Processing Model Applied to Health and Risk Messaging; Communication Privacy Management Theory and Health and Risk Messaging; Lay Risk Management; Motivated Information Management and Other Approaches to Information Seeking; Regulatory Focus and Regulatory Fit in Health Messaging; Social Cognitive Theory Applied to Health and Risk Messaging; Social Marketing Applied to Health and Risk Messaging; Transportation Theory Applied to Health and Risk Messaging; Thought Speed and Health Communication; Structuration Theory and Health and Risk Messaging; Message Convergence Framework Applied to Health and Risk Messaging; Simultaneous and Successive Emotion Experiences and Health and Risk Messaging; Reasoned Action as an Approach to Understanding and Predicting Health Message Outcomes; Theory of Mind and Communication in Health and Risk Messaging; Mental Models of Risk; VI. Message-induced, affect-based motivational processes; Anger in Health and Risk Messaging; Anticipated Regret; Embarrassment and Health and Risk Messaging; Fear Arousal and Health and Risk Messaging; Using Guilt to Motivate Individuals to Adopt Healthy Habits; Hope and Health and Risk Messaging; Positive Affect Related to Health and Risk Messaging; VII. Message-induced, cognitive-based motivational processes; Knowledge and Comprehension; Memory for Media Content in Health Communication; Risk Perceptions and Risk Characteristics; Responsibility in Health and Risk Messaging; Message-Induced Self-Efficacy and its Role in Health Behavior Change; Social Amplification of Risk in Health and Risk Messaging; Source Credibility, Expertise, and Trust in Health and Risk Messaging; Self-Affirmation; VIII. Channel-related processes; Agenda Setting in Health and Risk Messaging; Cultivation in Health and Risk Messaging; Mass Communication and Policy Gatekeeping; Conflicting Information and Message Competition in Health and Risk Messaging; Presumed Media Influence in Health and Risk Messaging; Spiral of Silence in Health and Risk Messaging; IX. Structural message features; Appeals to Morality in Health and Risk Messaging; Argument Quality and Strength in Health and Risk Messaging; Celebrity-based Appeals in Health and Risk Messaging; Counterfactuals in Health and Risk Messaging; Message Framing Variations in Health and Risk Messaging; Text Features Related to Message Comprehension; Metaphor in Health and Risk Communication; Message Sensation Value in Health and Risk; Narratives in Health and Risk Messaging; Nutrition Labeling in Health and Risk Messaging in Asia; Nutrition Labeling in the United States and the Role of Consumer Processing, Message Structure, and Moderating Conditions; Patterns of Reasoning; Vividness; Statistical Evidence in Health and Risk Messaging; Types of Explanations in Health and Risk Messaging; Using Maps to Display Geographic Risk, Personal Health Data, and Ownership; Using Pictures in Health and Risk Messages; Behavioral Journalism in Health and Risk Messaging; Exemplification Theory in Health and Risk Messaging; Using Questions in Health and Risk Message Design; Resistance Induction in the Context of Health Decision Making; Humor in Health and Risk Messaging; Health-related Warning Message Processing; X. Segmentation Approaches; Publics Approaches to Health and Risk Message Design and Processing; Transtheoretical Model and Stages of Change in Health and Risk Messaging; Audience Segmentation Techniques; Message Tailoring in Health and Risk Messaging; XI. Message exposure and reach; Immersive Virtual Environments, Avatars, and Agents for Health; Blogging, Microblogging, and Exposure to Health and Risk Messages; Direct-to-Consumer Advertising and Health and Risk Messaging; Location-based Ads and Exposure to Health and Risk Messages; Mobile Health and Exposures to Health and Risk Messages; Social Media for Healthcare Communication; Video Games and Gaming: Reaching Audiences with Health and Risk Messages; Viral Marketing and Exposure to Health and Risk Messages; Popular Media and Exposure to Health and Risk Messages; Public Service Announcements and Exposure to Health and Risk Messages; XII. Message recipient psychological characteristics; Ambiguity Intolerance Considerations When Designing Health and Risk Messages; Message Recipient Psychological Characteristics: Incurious and Curious Motives to Learn about Health Risks; Fatalism and Locus of Control as a Consideration When Designing Health and Risk Messages; Mood's Role in Selective Exposure to Health and Risk Information; Narcissism as a Consideration When Designing Health and Risk Messages; Optimism and its Associations with Health Behavior and Responses to Health Communication; Procrastination, Health, and Health Risk Communication; Sensation Seeking; Worry and Rumination as a Consideration When Designing Health and Risk Messages; XIII. Message recipient sociodemographic characteristics; Lifespan and Developmental Considerations in Health and Risk Message Design; Gender as a Consideration When Designing Health and Risk Messages; Deaf or Hard of Hearing Message Recipient Sociodemographic Characteristics; Numeracy in Health and Risk Messaging; Media Literacy as a Consideration in Health and Risk Message Design; Occupation and the Risk Message Recipient; Limited English Proficiency as a Consideration When Designing Health and Risk Messages; Vision and Promoting Health; Health Literacy and Health/Risk Communication; XIV. Methods ; Big Data's Role in Health and Risk Messaging; Network Analysis and Health and Risk Messaging; Physiological Measures of Wellness and Message Processing; Active Involvement Interventions in Health and Risk Messaging; Campaign Evaluation in Health and Risk Messaging; Measuring Graph Literacy; Grounded Theory Methodology; Meta-analysis in Health and Risk Messaging; XV. Case studies; The Breast Cancer and Environment Research Program; keepin' It REAL: A Case History of a Drug Prevention Intervention; Case Study: Targeting the Stop.Think.Connect Cybersecurity Campaign to University Campuses, A; The ACT2 Program and Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities in HIV and AIDS Clinical Trials: A Health and Risk Messaging Case Study; Creating Authentic and Lasting Community Relationships to Enhance Awareness and Understanding of Cancer Research; Social Influence Processes and Health Outcomes in Alcoholics Anonymous; Case Study of Sesame Workshop's Cleaner, Happier, Healthier Intervention in Bangladesh, India, and Nigeria: Reporting on Exposure and Impact, A; Recruiting Opinion Leaders for the United Kingdom ASSIST Programme; Rhetorical Dimensions of Active Shooter Training Messages

About the author: 

Roxanne Parrott is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Communication Arts & Sciences at The Pennsylvania State University. She received a PhD in communication with a minor in health policy and administration from the University of Arizona. She served on the National Academies of Sciences' Institute of Medicine Board of Population Health and Public Health Practice for five years. Parrott authored the award-winning book, Talking about Health, Why Communication Matters and co-edited the award winning book, Designing Health Messages: Approaches from Communication Theory and Public Health Practice.

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