OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

Post Sovereign Constitutional Making: Learning and Legitimacy

ISBN : 9780198755982

Price(incl.tax): 
¥15,961
Author: 
Andrew Arato
Pages
320 Pages
Format
Hardcover
Size
156 x 234 mm
Pub date
Mar 2016
Series
Oxford Constitutional Theory
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Constitutional politics has become a major terrain of contemporary struggles. Contestation around designing, replacing, revising, and dramatically re-interpreting constitutions is proliferating worldwide. Starting with Southern Europe in post-Franco Spain, then in the ex-Communist countries in Central Europe, post-apartheid South Africa, and now in the Arab world, constitution making has become a project not only of radical political movements, but of liberals and conservatives as well. Wherever new states or new regimes will emerge in the future, whether through negotiations, revolutionary process, federation, secession, or partition, the making of new constitutions will be a key item on the political agenda. Combining historical comparison, constitutional theory, and political analysis, this volume links together theory and comparative analysis in order to orient actors engaged in constitution making processes all over the world. The book examines two core phenomena: the development of a new, democratic paradigm of constitution making, and the resulting change in the normative discussions of constitutions, their creation, and the source of their legitimacy. After setting out a theoretical framework for understanding these developments, Andrew Arato examines recent constitutional politics in South Africa, Hungary, Turkey, and Latin America and discusses the political stakes in constitution-making. The book concludes by offering a systematic critique of the alternative to the new paradigm, populism and populist constituent politics.

Index: 

Introduction: Beyond the Paradox of Constitution
Part I: History and Theory
1 Constituent Authority
2 Constitutional Learning
3 Conventions, Constituent Assemblies, and Roundtables
Part II: Two Case Studies
4 The Hungarian Paradox
5 Turkey: Authoritarian Constitution Making, Reform, and the Crisis of Constitutionalism
Part III: Populist Constituent Politics
6 Political Theology and Populism
Conclusion

About the author: 

Andrew Arato is the Dorothy Hart Hirshon Professor of Political and Social Theory in the department of sociology at The New School. He is best known for his influential book Civil Society and Political Theory, co-authored with Jean L. Cohen. From 1994 to 2014 he was the co-editor of the journal Constellations.

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