OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

Oxford Day 2017

Oxford University Press in partnership with Keio University Global Research InstituteOxford Day 2017: THE POWER OF LANGUAGE

Recent social and political issues are impacting communication on a global scale and in turn shaping policy in local education. As an authority on the English language OUP influences how language reflects the times through publications such as the Oxford English Dictionary and the Word of the Year. To commemorate the 60th anniversary of OUP Japan we are pleased to present the 5th annual Oxford Day, in partnership with Keio University’s Global Research Institute. Keio University is a leading institution in Japan committed to contributing to global society and learning through interdisciplinary approaches. Oxford Day will bring together local and international speakers to discuss the influence language has on social, political, legal and educational issues.

Thank you for joining us at Oxford Day 2017. Please access the "Presenters" section to view a select number of presentation slides from the day.

Date and Venue

Date
Sunday 22 October 2017
Time
Doors Open at 8:45
Venue
Keio University
Mita Campus, South School Bldg.
2-15-45 Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo

 

Admission fee

Admission: 1,000 yen (Students: Free*)

Admission + reception: 2,000 yen (Students: 500 yen*)

*with valid student ID

 

 

Partnership with

Keio University Global Research Institute

 

Endorsed by

British Council

 

Organizer / Contact

Oxford University Press
Tel: 03-5444-5454

E-mail:elt.japan@oup.com

Recommended for

Teachers of English, academics, researchers, graduate students and general public interested in language and education

 

  • Philip N. Howard - Plenary Speaker
    (Statutory Professor of Internet Studies at the Oxford Internet Institute and Senior Fellow of Balliol College at the University of Oxford)
  • Peter Gilliver
    (Associate Editor, Oxford English Dictionary, Author of The Making of the Oxford English Dictionary)
  • Curtis Kelly
    (Professor of English, Faculty of Commerce, Kansai University)
  • Keigo Komamura
    (Keio University Executive Director, Professor of Faculty of Law, Director of Keio Global Research Institute)
  • Kosta Lekanides
    (Co-author of IB Theory of Knowledge Skills and Practice, Author of IB Extended Essay)
  • Akito Okada
    (Professor Graduate School of International Studies, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
  • Keiko Okawa
    (Professor of Keio University Graduate School of Media Design / Vice Director of Research Institute for Digital Media and Content, Keio University)
  • Satoko Tokunaga
    (Associate Professor, Keio University Faculty of Literature)
  • Junichi Yokota
    (Teacher at Saitama Prefectural Showa High School)
  • Kensaku Yoshida
    (Distinguished Professor, Director, Center of Language Education and Research, Sophia University)

 

Recommended Books

OUP publications related to Oxford Day 2017 will be on display on the day and can be purchased on this website before or after the event. Click here for the full list of recommended books.

 

Schedule and content are subject to change without prior notice.
Updated: October 25, 2017

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Philip N. Howard(Statutory Professor of Internet Studies at the Oxford Internet Institute / Senior Fellow of Balliol College at the University of Oxford)
Philip N. Howard is a statutory Professor of Internet Studies at the Oxford Internet Institute and a Senior Fellow at Balliol College at the University of Oxford. He is also a writer and has published eight books and over 100 academic articles, book chapters, conference papers, and commentary essays on information technology, international affairs and public life. His research spans several disciplines, and he is among a small number of scholars who have won awards from all three major academic associations for his work in political science, sociology, and communication. Howard’s research and commentary writing has been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, and many international media outlets.
Presentation title[Plenary] The Power of Language and Influence of Social Media(English)
Social media platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter, have given us important new platforms for public life. Unfortunately, many of these platforms are not designed for healthy public conversations. And a growing number of governments and politicians have found ways to use platform features as a way to manipulate public opinion and control public deliberation. The algorithms of these platforms now spread volumes of junk news, conspiracy theories, and misinformation. Fake users and automated accounts pollute reasonable political debates. With evidence from a large project on “Computational Propaganda”, funded by the European Research Council, I discuss the ways in which social media platforms have become the key infrastructures for political discourse, identify how these technological affordances have put us into a democratic deficit, and conclude with some ideas about ways in which social media platforms could be a better infrastructure for deliberative democracy.
 

Presentation

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Peter Gilliver(Associate Editor, Oxford English Dictionary, Author of Making of the Oxford English Dictionary)
Peter Gilliver has been an editor of the Oxford English Dictionary since 1987, and is now one of the Dictionary's most experienced lexicographers; he has also contributed to several other dictionaries published by OUP. He has written and published widely on the history of the OED; his book The Making of the Oxford English Dictionary was published by OUP in 2016. He is also the co-author (with Jeremy Marshall and Edmund Weiner) of The Ring of Words: Tolkien and the Oxford English Dictionary (2006).
Presentation titleOxford's English Dictionaries: a Living History of English(English)
Oxford University Press has been publishing dictionaries of English for over 130 years. The most famous of these dictionaries is the great Oxford English Dictionary, and in my presentation I will tell the story of this project from its origins 160 years ago to the present. I will also talk about the development of some of OUP's other important English dictionaries, and about how today's lexicographers are continuing to monitor and describe the English language. There are some important Japanese connections in these stories, and I will also review these.
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Curtis Kelly (Professor of English, Faculty of Commerce, Kansai University)
Curtis Kelly has spent most of his life developing learner-centered materials for “3L” students, those with Low ability, Low confidence, and Low motivation. His experience with such students has led him to a life mission of “relieving the suffering of the classroom.” To achieve his mission, he has become fascinated with the neuroscience of learning. Dr. Kelly is a professor at Kansai University in Japan and the coordinator of the JALT Brain SIG. He has written over 30 successful, well-known books and has made over 400 presentations on neuroscience, adult education, motivation, and teaching writing.
Presentation titleThe Neuroscience of Stories: Why Our Brains Love Them(English)
Stories, the mainstay of extensive reading, are also the original Wikipedia, and one of the oldest tools of teaching. For most of human existence, we have used stories to share information and educate our offspring about the wiles of the world. It is no wonder our brains have evolved to process stories so much more effectively than other formats of delivery. In fact, stories do more than information transfer, they cause a parallel activation of the insula that results in brain linking. The presenter will provide the neuroscience behind stories, data on their power, and methods for using them.
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Keigo Komamura(Keio University Vice President, Professor of Faculty of Law, Director of Keio Global Research Institute)
Keigo Komamura, Ph. D (law), is vice president of Keio University and professor of law at the Faculty of Law of the university. He is an expert of constitutional law and comparative studies between the Japanese and American constitutions. He serves on the Advisory Council for the Constitutional Revision Research Project, of the Reischauer Institute of Harvard University. His most recent publication is an edited volume with Satoshi Machidori, Kenpou kaisei no hikaku seijigaku (Comparative Politics of Constitutional Revision), published by Koubundou Press in 2016.
Presentation titleSelf-Reference by Person of Power - The Language of President Trump and the Emperor of Japan(Japanese)
The theme for Oxford Day 2017 is, of course, "The Power of Language." American philosopher Judith Butler once referred to words as "conduct or agency" which causes damage to others and she offered some measures to mitigate the impact of words that wound. Surely words have power. The power of words reach a peak when persons of power use them in their speeches. However, these days, words and speeches by the highest officials and public figures are abused, corrupted, or idled with "unbearable lightness." In my presentation i will examine two speech cases of major constitutional figures of US and Japan, President Trump and the Emperor of Japan.
Presentation
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Kosta Lekanides (Co-author of IB Theory of Knowledge Skills and Practice, Author of IB Extended Essay)
Kosta Lekanides is an IB author and workshop leader, with over 17 years’ teaching experience in Australia, Japan and the United Arab Emirates. He studied English, Greek, History and Politics at the University of Sydney, Australia, before embarking on a career in international education. He is specializes in the teaching of History and Theory of Knowledge and is committed to engendering critical debates in class and instilling a sense of awe in students about the process of learning. He is the co-author of Theory of Knowledge Skills and Practice resource, and the author of Extended Essay Course Companion (published by OUP). He is the Chairperson for the UAE IB Diploma Coordinators' Group and is involved in the development of the UAE Association of IB Schools. He is currently Assistant Head Teacher, Head of IB Programmes and TOK Coordinator at Jumeirah English Speaking School (JESS) in Dubai.
Presentation titleWarning: Education Can be Flammable - "The Mind is not a Vessel That Needs Filling, but Wood That Needs Igniting."(English)
The aim of this talk is to explore different ways an IB educator can inspire the students in their care. Inspire to seek out richer experiences, inspire to pursue more meaningful knowledge (both personal and shared), inspire them to have a deep reverence for learning. Quite simply, the talk aims to find ways for students to become people worth knowing by exploring, among other things, concepts such as the usefulness of doubt, the role of personality, the value of caring, the power of story-telling and the reigniting of curiosity.
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Akito Okada (Professor Graduate School of International Studies, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
Akito Okada has been Professor of Comparative and International Education at the Graduate School of International Studies, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, and is a leading Japanese researcher in comparative education, particularly with reference to equality of opportunity in school and higher education in Japan and England. He has published widely in scholarly journals and is the author of four books in English including, most recently, Education Policy and Equal Opportunity in Japan (Berghahn Press, 2011). He has been very active in international research collaborations and has presented papers at over 50 conferences in Japan, North America, Europe and Asia. He was formerly Vice President of the Japan International Education Society and is a current member of the Japan Comparative Education Society. He was a visiting Professor University College London (from Oct 2015 to March 2016).
Presentation titleEducation Reform: Challenges Towards a Knowledge Society in Japan(Japanese)
Improving educational institutions has been shown to advance socioeconomic development, reduce inequality, enhance the economic competitiveness of nations, and fortify governmental institutions. Nevertheless, the Japanese school system faces many obstacles in getting meaningful education reforms approved or implemented. Firstly, this presentation will analyse recent scholarship on the hurdles that education reforms tend to encounter. It will also identify theoretically informed hypotheses based on recent successes and failures of reform in Japan. The second purpose of this presentation is to show how the issue of "equal educational opportunities" has been discussed while going through the education policy and the education reforms in Japan for 2020. We will discuss current issues, how the study of education can approach these issues, and indicate a focused method on the perspectives of equal opportunity.
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Keiko Okawa (Professor of Keio University Graduate School of Media Design / Vice Director of Research Institute for Digital Media and Content, Keio University)
Keiko Okawa has been involved in technology development in Japan and the US IT industry for about 12 years. After working at the United Nations University, she received her doctorate from Keio University in 2001 in Academic Education and ICT Research. She has led an inter-university educational cooperation project throughout Asia centered on ICT for about 15 years. Her current research has expanded to global education, promoting practical research for a wide range of age groups from preschool children to all members of society. She has also directed on-line course development for the International MOOC Project at Keio University since 2015.
Presentation titleDigital Technology and Language(Japanese)
Some say the development of digital technology and the Internet is pushing the globalization of society, and as a result there is concern that local culture is being lost. Language and technology each contribute greatly and influence the development of globalization, and have a close relationship with each other. In this presentation, we will consider the relationship between the development of digital technology and language taking examples of the linguistic expression in digital technology and the role of language in a global learning space using MOOC as an example.
 
Presentation
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Satoko Tokunaga (Associate Professor, Keio University Faculty of Literature)
Satoko Tokunaga received her PhD from Keio University (2005) and was a Visiting Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (2010-11). She is now Associate Professor at Keio. She specializes in medieval English literature, bibliography and history of the book. She is currently preparing with her research partners a critical edition of The Golden Legend, a Middle English translation by William Caxton, for the Early English Text Society.
Presentation titleScholarly Editing Now: Medieval Texts in Focus(Japanese)
We gain access to and understanding of the text in both traditional and new forms when we enjoy literary works. It is often the case that we use scholarly editions, i.e. texts critically edited. This presentation will consider the past and the present of scholarly editing, which is a practice and process of understanding the language. Medieval English texts in manuscript and print will be examined as a case study.
presentation
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Junichi Yokota (Teacher at Saitama Prefectural Showa High School)
Junichi Yokota was born in Saitama and earned his Doctorate in English Linguistics from Dokkyo University Graduate School of Foreign Languages in 1997. He has worked at Saitama Prefecture Showa High School since 2011. In 2012 he conducted research and published a report on knowledge composition type Jigsaw method for the National Institute for Educational Policy Research. In 2016 he received a certification from MEXT as a leader of English language education promotion. He is has written extensively on English education and lectured at the university level and has a range of interests including: Active learning, using ICT in lessons and guidance on e-learning.
Presentation titleExploring the Foundations for Promoting Active Learning in Lessons(Japanese)
In this presentation, I will introduce some actual examples to build the knowledge and skills that students are expected to acquire through cooperative learning with other students. I will explore ways to help students move from knowledge of vocabulary to practical vocabulary use, how to provide grammar instruction in a natural setting and also ways to teach writing and speaking skills from a starting point of reading and listening. I will also look at ways to design lessons putting active learning into place. This presentation will assist senior high school teachers in thinking about how to revisit the basics as well as cover warm up activities used at some high level schools. This presentation will be useful for junior high school teachers' as well.
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Kensaku Yoshida (Distinguished Professor, Director, Center of Language Education and Research, Sophia University)
Kensaku Yoshida was born in Kyoto in 1948. He graduated from the Department of English at the Sophia University Foreign Language Department and completed a Master's degree in Linguistics from the university graduate school. He also studied in the doctoral course at the University of Michigan. He was Chair, MEXT Committee of Specialists on Revision of English Education, Chair, MEXT Committee to Discuss Ways to Improve the Foreign Language Ability of the Japanese, member of the Foreign Language Sub-committee of the Central Education Committee, former Trustee of The International Research Foundation for English Language Education (TIRF), President of the Airline Pilots’ English Proficiency Assessment Committee, President of J-Shine, Recipient of the Transportation Culture Award (Ministry of Land and Transportation), Recipient of the Best of JALT Award, etc.
Presentation titleThe New Course of Study and University Entrance Exams(English)
MEXT has revealed the new course of study, with major changes in the way foreign languages are to be taught in the future. The most important change is the setting of Can-do criteria as instructional objectives. These performance-based criteria assume teaching of foreign languages will be conducted using all four skills. However, entrance examinations only test one or two skills, disregarding the productive skills of speaking and writing. To address this, the University Center Test will be replaced by a four-skills test from 2020. In addition, foreign language education in secondary school will include content-based teaching, including CLIL, resulting in the need for universities to incorporate the teaching of subject matter in foreign languages as well. In this talk I will discuss the basic educational goals set for all subjects as well as Active Learning and discuss how changes in primary and secondary education will impact university education. I will also introduce the implementation of CLIL in Sophia University's foreign language programs.
Presentation

Schedule and content are subject to change without prior notice.
Updated: November 21, 2017

Timetable

8:45 Doors Open / Registration
9:45-10:00 Welcome Address: Oxford University Press
10:00-10:15 Welcome Address: Keio University
10:15-10:25 Break
10:25-11:25 Warning: Education Can be Flammable - "The Mind is Not a Vessel That Needs Filling, but Wood That Needs Igniting." Kosta Lekanides (language: English) Scholarly Editing Now:
Medieval Texts in FocusSatoko Tokunaga (language: Japanese)
Education Reform:
Challenges towards a Knowledge Society in JapanAkito Okada (language: Japanese)
11:25-11:45 Break
11:45-12:45 [Plenary] The Power of Language and Influence of Social Media Philip N. Howard (language: English)
12:45-14:00 Lunch Break
14:00-15:00 Oxford’s English Dictionaries:
a Living History of EnglishPeter Gilliver (language: English)
Digital Technology and LanguageKeiko Okawa(language: Japanese) Exploring the Foundations for Promoting Active Learning in LessonsJunichi Yokota (language: Japanese)
15:00-15:20 Break
15:20-16:20 The Neuroscience of Stories:
Why Our Brains Love ThemCurtis Kelly (language: English)
Self-Reference by Person of Power - The Language of President Trump and the Emperor of JapanKeigo Komamura (language: Japanese) The New Course of Study and University Entrance ExamsKensaku Yoshida (language: English)
16:45-18:45 Networking Reception

Schedule and content are subject to change without prior notice.
Updated: July 4, 2017

Opinion Survey on 'The Power of Language’

Emoji and Abbreviated Words Make Communication Quick and Accurate. Leaders’ Words Have Profound Influence

It can be said that "Language" plays an important role in communication and is an essential tool in our everyday life. Ahead of the Oxford Day 2017, Oxford University Press conducted an opinion survey to explore how we perceive and utilize language in our contemporary information-oriented society. This survey had over 230 responses, mainly from educators in Japan.

Accessibility and reliability are essential for news content

In response to the question of where to get information to stay updated with current affairs, over 60% of respondents identified TV or news sites (digital newspaper). In the following question, why you choose these, a majority of respondents indicated ‘accessible’ or ‘reliable’. It can be said this is a reflection of our current situation surrounded with overwhelming information.

Accessibility and reliability are essential for news content image1
Accessibility and reliability are essential for news content image2
Accessibility and reliability are essential for news content image1
Accessibility and reliability are essential for news content image2

Emoji and Abbreviated Words Can Convey Emotion More Precisely

In response to the question about the usage of emoji, abbreviated words or internet slang in text messaging communication, over 80% of respondents answered ‘Yes (more or less)’. Over 80% of them identified the reason as ‘it complements the expression of feeling and emotion’, followed by the answers ‘it is rapid and efficient’ and ‘it makes communication softer and casual’. This shows trends of how we manage information overload in our contemporary situation.

On the other hand, a majority of those who answered “Never use emoji, abbreviated words nor internet slang in their text communication”, identified the reason as ‘text is a sufficient tool to express what you would like to convey if you use it correctly’ and ‘it is not age-appropriate’ . Also, some mentioned, ‘it sounds childish and immature’ and ‘it may cause misunderstanding and miscommunication’.。

Emoji and Abbreviated Words Can Convey Emotion More Precisely  image1

Those who answered ‘Yes’ frequently use emoji and abbreviations which express positive feelings, such as a smiley face icon and the abbreviation ‘lol’ meaning laugh out loud. Also, a significant number of respondents use emoji which express subtle feelings which are not clearly categorized, neither delight, anger, sorrow nor pleasure emotions; (^_^;) to imply embarrassment, and m(_ _)m to show an action to kneel down on the ground which is used as apologizing and asking for something, and which would add politeness in a casual tone of the communication.

Leaders’ words influence the people throughout the ages

On the question about a quote or phrase that made an impact on you, a majority of respondents answered with proverbs such as “once in a lifetime encounter” and “practice makes perfect”. Also, a significant number of respondents posted the words and phrases of figures who lead people such as politicians, religious leaders, military leaders, parents and teachers. The most common phrase was “Where there is a will, there is a way”. This is a common phrase in both English and Japanese, though the origin is not clear. Some participants attributed the saying to Abraham Lincoln, Shingen Takeda (a Japanese military commander from 16th century) or Yozan Uesugi (a Japanese feudal lord from 18-19th century).

Top 3 common phrases which made an impact on you

1. Where there is a will, there is a way.
2. Once in a lifetime encounter
3. Practice makes perfect

About the Survey

This Opinion Survey on “THE POWER OF LANGUAGE” was conducted by Oxford University Press (OUP) between September 14 and September 30, 2017. 233 people based in Japan participated in this survey via an online survey produced by OUP. All respondents were over 20 years old; approx. 60% were educators; approx. 67% were Japanese native speakers.

 

* When quoting or reproducing the results of this survey, please include the credit line as below: Opinion Survey on 'THE POWER OF LANGUAGE’ by Oxford University Press, 2017.

Recommended Books

OUP publications related to Oxford Day 2017 will be on display on the day and can be purchased on this website before or after the event. Click here for the full list of recommended books.

Articles from OUP Global Blog

Learning about lexicography: A Q&A with Peter Gilliver (Part 1)interview with Peter Gilliver (October 2016)
-- I can't remember a time when I wasn't interested in language. Both my parents were language teachers, and the family was always discussing English words and usages. And I remember being fascinated by the first dictionary I ever looked at ... Read More
Learning about lexicography: A Q&A with Peter Gilliver (Part 2)interview with Peter Gilliver (October 2016)
-- Working on the OED it's hard not to develop an awareness of its history. We may be making use of all the modern tools that has to offer the 21st-century lexicographer, but we're also surrounded by evidence of that history ... Read More
Who's next? Digital media and the inevitable surprise of political unrestby Philip Howard (March 2011)
Political discontent has cascaded across North Africa and the Middle East. Entrenched dictators with decades of experience controlling political life have fallen or had to make major concessions ... Read More

 

*Pre-registration is now closed – If you wish to attend the event you can register on the day at the venue.

 

Pay on the day

Please pay admission fee at the reception on the day. Cash only.

Fee
General: Presentations only: 1,000yen
General: Presentations and Networking Reception: 2,000yen
Students: Presentations only: Free
Students: Presentations and Networking Reception: 500yen
*Students will be required to show valid student ID at the reception on the day.

 

*All prices include tax.


Partnership with
  • keio University
  • KRGI
Endorsed by
  • British Council